Current Lab Members

 

PI: Amanda E. Guyer

Associate Professor | Chancellor’s Fellow 2014-2015
Dept. of Human Ecology | Center for Mind & Brain
Education: PhD (Yale University), BA (Skidmore College)

267 Cousteau Pl., Room 196, Davis, California 95618
aeguyer@ucdavis.edu | 530-297-4445

Human Development Profile

Guyer_CV


Jonathan HelmIMG_1127

Postdoctoral Scholar
Guyer Lab
Education: PhD (University of California, Davis), BS (University of California, Davis)
267 Cousteau Pl., Room 194, Davis, California 95618
jlhelm@ucdavis.edu|

Jonathan Helm is a post-doctoral researcher working with Amanda Guyer and Paul Hastings. He is generally interested in longitudinal data analysis, and has deeper interest in estimation of nonlinear models, multilevel differential equation models, and variance heterogeneity models. Jonathan adapts these techniques for testing hypotheses surrounding self-regulation and co-regulation. During graduate school, he developed and implemented models for estimating synchrony of physiological responses between romantic partners (including heart rate, respiration, and respiratory sinus arrhythmia), and for predicting between-couple differences in synchrony (with relationship satisfaction, attachment, length of the relationship). His dissertation proposed a method for estimating both linear and nonlinear change in synchrony, while allowing for between-dyad differences in the change pattern as well as predictors of dyad-specific changes. Currently, he develops statistical models that examine dynamics between parents and children which directly correspond to the development of self-regulation.


Roberta SchriberSchriber - Photo (2015-08-05)

Postdoctoral Scholar
Guyer Lab
Education: PhD (UC Davis), BA (Reed College)
267 Cousteau Pl., Room 195, Davis, California 95618
raschriber@ucdavis.edu |

After coming of age in Houston, TX, Robie (pronounced “Roe-bee”) completed her B.A. at Reed College in Portland, OR, and her Ph.D. in Social/Personality Psychology at UC Davis under Dr. Richard Robins. Her dissertation examined how personality, emotion, and self-insight are impacted in high-functioning individuals with the neurodevelopmental disorder of autism. She now applies her interests in personality, emotion, and the self to the study of how individual differences in neurobiological factors interact with social and cultural experiences (e.g., parenting history, peer rejection, ethnic discrimination, cultural identity) to shape adolescent development in another unique population: Mexican-origin adolescents, members of the largest and fastest-growing ethnic minority group in the U.S. Her multimethod approach combines structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging, social-cognitive tasks, clinical measures, and self- and informant reports in longitudinal samples of youths and their families. She is extremely high on Openness to Experience and loves language and the sea.

Dissertation research published as:


Veronika VilgisVeronika

Postdoctoral Scholar
Guyer Lab
Education: PhD (University of Melbourne, Australia), MA (Hons) (University of Glasgow, UK)
267 Cousteau Pl., Room 194, Davis, California 95618
vvilgis@ucdavis.edu|

Veronika Vilgis joined the lab in January 2016 after having completed her PhD at the University of Melbourne, Australia. She has an interest in brain development and how changes in brain structure and function relate to the onset and maintenance of affective disorders such as depression and anxiety. Her PhD focused on the broader question whether shared symptoms across neurodevelopmental disorders also share the same underlying neurobiology. To address this question she has compared groups of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and persistent depressive disorder using functional magnetic resonance imaging. In her current work, Veronika continues to use structural and functional imaging approaches to examine the longitudinal brain development in at risk samples such as the Pittsburgh Girls Study and the California Families Project.


Lee_picture

Clinton Lee

Postdoctoral Scholar
Guyer Lab
Education: PhD (University of California, Davis), BA (University of California, Irvine)
267 Cousteau Pl., Room 182, Davis, California 95618
cclee@ucdavis.edu |

I made the harrowing journey from Southern California to Northern California to investigate the neuro-cognitive underpinnings of adolescents’ risky decision making. I am interested in how reward processing might be related to whether adolescents engage in risk-taking behaviors including substance use. I am also interested in understanding social and biological factors that characterize adolescents who are sensitive to positive or negative peer influences. To pursue this interest, I utilize various measurement and analysis methodologies such as questionnaire and fMRI data and regression and structural equation modeling analyses.


David WeissmanIMG_0049 (1)

Graduate Student
Guyer Lab
Education: BA (University of Southern California)
267 Cousteau Pl., Room 156, Davis, California 95618
dgweissman@ucdavis.edu |

I grew up in Dayton, Ohio and obtained my bachelors degree at the University of Southern California, where I majored in Neuroscience. I then taught middle school in Oakland, California for 5 years, where I gained an intimate appreciation for adolescent development. I’m interested in how exposure to environmental stressors like violence and poverty affect the way adolescents process and regulate their emotions. I live in Davis, California with my wife and coach junior high cross country at Holmes Junior High in Davis.


Kristina Gelardikristina_headshot (1)

Graduate Student
Guyer Lab
Education: BA (Barnard College, Columbia University), MS (University of California, Davis)
267 Cousteau Pl., Room 182, Davis, California 95618
klgelardi@ucdavis.edu |

I am interested in the relationship between environmental factors (e.g., family, community) and neurophysiological and behavioral responses to stressors in adolescence exposed to multiple risk factors, including poverty, violence, and depression. My dissertation examines the associations between childhood adversity of poverty and parental stress on adolescent emotion regulation as measured by self report and neuroimaging.


Luis Parra Luis-web-7a (1)

Graduate Student
NSF-GRFP Fellow

Guyer Lab
Education: BA (California State University, Northridge)
267 Cousteau Pl., Room 156, Davis, California 95618
lparra@ucdavis.edu |

I am a third-year Human Development graduate student in the Department of Human Ecology at the University of California, Davis. I work under the supervision of my primary graduate advisers Drs. Paul D. Hastings in the Department of Psychology and Amanda E. Guyer in the Department of Human Ecology. My research focuses on three interconnected areas:

  1. The intersection of ethnic/racial and sexual minority identities. Specifically, I study the effects of compounded ethnic/racial and sexual minority prejudice (i.e., stress) on physiological self-regulatory mechanisms via hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and immune system functioning, and in turn, their effects on psychosocial adjustment (e.g., depression). I also seek to identify resilience factors such as parent and peer social support and coping strategies to help ameliorate the adverse effects of prejudice in sexual minority people of color. This is study is funded by the American Psychology Foundation’s Wayne F. Placek Grant awarded in 2015. http://www.apa.org/apf/funding/placek.aspx?tab=1
  2. I also am interested in peer-relationship processes during adolescence, particularly in ethnic minority youth of Mexican-origin. I focus on emotion regulation processes via parasympathetic system activation (e.g., heart rate variability and RSA) when adolescents experience rejection by peers and their effects on psychosocial adjustment.
  3. Lastly, I am interested in methodological issues associated with retrospective reports of peer victimization. In collaboration with Dr. Adrienne Nishina in the Human Development Graduate Group, using data from the UCLA Peer Project, we are testing how retrospective and concurrent reports of peer victimization are related to adolescents’ psychosocial adjustment.

During my free time, I run. Also, I love to cook, bake, learn about wine, and occasionally draw or paint.


Raj ChahalRaj

Graduate Student
Guyer Lab
Education: BS (University of California, Davis)
267 Cousteau Pl., Room 182, Davis, California 95618
rchahal@ucdavis.edu |

I grew up in San Jose, California and graduated from UC Davis in 2012 with a B.S. in Psychology, emphasis in Biology. My research interests focus on the development of brain systems supporting inhibitory control and emotion regulation in adolescence and young adulthood, which can be studied using functional magnetic resonance imaging and measures of executive performance. Currently, I am exploring resting-state developmental trajectories within the fronto-limbic region of the brain, including the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the prefrontal cortex (PFC), which may contribute to differences in the appraisal of motivational and emotional information.